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15 posts tagged museum

Glenn Kaino’s Balancing Act in Chicago

Kaino “believes that art can change the world, that it has political agency,” he said — but “with a constant struggle for its own relevancy, particularly within the museum and gallery space.” The artist’s Chicago solo exhibition raises interesting questions in this regard: Is a MakerBot-printed rock as efficacious as a real one, hurled at the cops? What is gained (or lost) when politics is mined for aesthetics, and how can the works’ origin story be imparted without coming across as preachy? READ ON

5 Must-See Gallery Shows:

Kristen Schiele at Lu Magnus Gallery, through October 12 (55 Hester Street)

“It feels as modular and free as I can make it — lots of details, color, and textures,” says Kristen Schiele of the paintings, collages, and wall sculptures in her latest exhibition, “Spirit Girls.” Schiele — who recently gave birth to a baby girl — has created these works as a thought experiment, projecting the sort of environments her daughter might inhabit and encounter as she becomes a young adult. Overall, it’s a massive development of what the artist terms her “lo-fi punk vernacular,” with layered elements (silkscreen, airbrush, acrylic, oil, stamped pigment) combining to create vibrantly intricate vignettes. READ ON...

Rebecca Warren at Matthew Marks Gallery, through October 25 (523 West 24th Street)

These painted-bronze sculptures elicit a strange mix of emotions, their phallic, distended Giacometti forms plumped with unexpected breasts and ornamented with pompoms. They’re both silly and noble, as are the hulking bronze rocks — lumpy and pattern-adorned — sitting on wheeled dollies. Warren mixes things up with a few more Minimalist pieces, like “You Are Quiet, I Will Be Too,” a steel, paper, and pompom wall sculpture that’s like an indecipherable sentence spelled out as a shelf.

Jason Rhoades at Zwirner Gallery, through October 18 (537 West 20th Street)

It seems like just yesterday that the Zwirner mini-empire invited a certain 20-something market darling to build a factory in one of their galleries, cranking out sugary candies along with a pervasive bad attitude. READ ON….

Fred Wilson at Pace Gallery, through October 18 (534 West 25th Street)

This array of conceptual work from 2004 through 2014 is punchy and pared-down, juggling a limited visual iconography (the design elements of African nations’ flags; bulbous blown-glass tear drops that appear to rain down the wall) and an almost entirely black-and-white tonal palette. “The Mete of the Muse,” 2006, pairs an “African” statue with a “European” one, mixing two very different visions of femininity, sexuality, and grace. 

Philippe Weisbecker at Zieher Smith & Horton, through October 4 (516 West 20th Street)

This show of intimate drawings, paintings, and sculptures at the newly rebranded gallery is full of tiny revelations. Scott Zieher, who met the French artist about a decade ago, describes Weisbecher’s complex appeal: He’s “deeply aware of Minimalism,” yet the work also has “the naivete of the opposite end of the emotional and conceptual spectrum in its vernacular, outsider feel.” 

ALSO WORTH SEEING

Lorenzo’s Reina Sofia Gift, Mexico’s Baroque Museum Stalled, and More

Garage Museum Teaches an Old Building New Tricks

Forty-seven years after it first debuted as Moscow’s largest restaurant and nearly a quarter century after it was abandoned, the Seasons of the Year will finally see new tenants. The Garage Museum of Contemporary Art announced yesterday that its forthcoming permanent home inside the Soviet-era eatery in the capital’s central Gorky Park is due to open in June 2015, READ ON

Articulating Space: The Architecture of the Sao Paulo Biennial 

READ IT

Gago Opens Sushi Joint, Bloomberg Gives 17M For Museum Tech, and More

The will open the three-football-field-sized gargantuan plaza tomorrow morning!:

Architecture 101: Iconic Buildings and Their Bizarre Nicknames

Musée Mobile (MuMo) visits Cameroon: how a roving shipping container became a world-class mobile art museum for children in France and Africa.

Jean-Michel Basquiat, “Untitled,” 1981 (detail)

Brassaï’s “Nude” (1931-34), part of the Met’s ”Naked Before the Camera” Show.

How to decode MoMA's category-defying “Ecstatic Alphabets” exhibition.

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